Kay Warren Talks about Grief as the One-year Anniversary of Matthew's Death Approaches

By Kay Warren On March 17, 2014

As the one-year anniversary of Matthew's death approaches, I have been shocked by some subtle and not-so-subtle comments indicating that perhaps I should be ready to "move on." The soft, compassionate cocoon that has enveloped us for the last 11 1/2 months had lulled me into believing others would be patient with us on our grief journey, and while I'm sure many will read this and quickly say "Take all the time you need," I'm increasingly aware that the cocoon may be in the process of collapsing. It's understandable when you take a step back. I mean, life goes on.

The thousands who supported us in the aftermath of Matthew's suicide wept and mourned with us, prayed passionately for us, and sent an unbelievable volume of cards, letters, emails, texts, phone calls, and gifts. The support was utterly amazing. But for most, life never stopped - their world didn't grind to a horrific, catastrophic halt on April 5, 2013.

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In fact, their lives have kept moving steadily forward with tasks, routines, work, kids, leisure, plans, dreams, goals etc. LIFE GOES ON. And some of them are ready for us to go on too. They want the old Rick and Kay back. They secretly wonder when things will get back to normal for us - when we'll be ourselves, when the tragedy of April 5, 2013 will cease to be the grid that we pass everything across.

And I have to tell you - the old Rick and Kay are gone. They're never coming back. We will never be the same again. There is a new "normal." April 5, 2013 has permanently marked us. It will remain the grid we pass everything across for an indeterminate amount of time....maybe forever.
Because these comments from well-meaning folks wounded me so deeply, I doubted myself and thought perhaps I really am not grieving "well" (whatever that means). I wondered if I was being overly sensitive -so I checked with parents who have lost children to see if my experience was unique. Far from it, I discovered. "At least you can have another child" one mother was told shortly after her child's death. "You're doing better, right?" I was asked recently. "When are you coming back to the stage at Saddleback? We need you" someone cluelessly said to me recently. "People can be so rude and insensitive; they make the most thoughtless comments," one grieving father said.

You know, it wasn't all that long ago that it was standard in our culture for people to officially be in mourning for a full year. They wore black. They didn't go to parties. They didn't smile a whole lot. And everybody accepted their period of mourning; no one ridiculed a mother in black or asked her stupid questions about why she was STILL so sad.

Obviously, this is no longer accepted practice; mourners are encouraged to quickly move on, turn the corner, get back to work, think of the positive, be grateful for what is left, have another baby, and other unkind, unfeeling, obtuse and downright cruel comments. What does this say about us - other than we're terribly uncomfortable with death, with grief, with mourning, with loss - or we're so self-absorbed that we easily forget the profound suffering the loss of a child creates in the shattered parents and remaining children.

Read full article at Kay Warren's facebook page.

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