Typhoon Haiyan: Scenes of Devastation - World Vision

By Press Release, World Vision On November 15, 2013

As aid workers and assessment teams are able to reach hard-hit areas of the Philippines, the extent of Typhoon Haiyan's destruction is evident. World Vision staff are on the ground in Cebu and Tacloban, capital city of Leyte province. 

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Gelian dela Cruz, 11 (left), is worried that her school is ruined. She was excited to do an oral recitation the day when the storm struck their town in Barangay Libertad, Bogo City, Cebu.  

 

orazon dela Cruz, 40, and her four children survived Typhoon Haiyan, including Corazon's husband, who was out looking for food. 

 

 

Analiza Magdadaro with her son in Barangay Kayang, Bogo City, Cebu.  

 

Isce Villordon's family lost everything in the typhoon. All she has left is her school books.   

 

In Barangay Libertad, Bogo City, Cebu, residents - including children - are recovering from Typhoon Haiyan's destruction. 

 

 


Nemesia Tipait, 81, was buried under the rubble of her house when it collapsed as the typhoon hit Barangay Kayang, Bogo City, Cebu. Neighbors rescued her and hope to rebuild her hut. 

Residents of Barangay Kayang, Lobo City, Cebu, with the remains of their home following Typhoon Haiyan.

 

A school damaged in Barangay Kayang, Lobo City, Cebu, after the typhoon. 

 

Children carry water from long distances after their village water system was destroyed by the typhoon in Barangay Kayang, Bogo City, Cebu. 

 

After traveling by boat and car for over a day, World Vision staff walked the remaining seven hours to Tacloban to find it "almost totally flattened," says Cecil Laguardia, World Vision staff member in the Philippines. Photo from Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 


Tacloban was virtually destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan. "There is massive mourning over loss of lives," says Aaron Aspi, World Vision communications staff in the Philippines. "It's difficult to see people crying and in shock over this catastrophe." Photo from Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 

 

"World Vision is working hard to bring lifesaving goods to families devastated by the storm and is sending teams to Northern Cebu, Panay Islands and Tacloban," says Aaron. "We are trying to clear travel routes to reach those in the hardest hit areas with food, water, and most essential supplies." Photo from Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 


We are working relentlessly to get to the areas in need," says Gjeff Lamigo, World Vision communications manager in the Philippines. Photo from Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 

 

We've heard reports that many children are crying for food, some haven't eaten in 2-3 days," says Gjeff. "The damage is beyond your imagination." Photo from Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 


"Everyone is hungry. Everyone here in Leyte is in distress," says Mai Zamora, World Vision communications staff on the ground in Tecloban. Photo from Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 

 

"Devastation is immense. I've never seen anything like this before," says Aaron Aspi. "Families were told to leave the danger zones to higher ground, but with the magnitude of this typhoon, even some of the evacuation centers were washed out." Photo from Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 

 

 

The biggest need right now still is the need for food and other survival essentials like clean water and emergency shelters," says Gjeff Lamigo. "There are about 680,000 displaced people in the Visayas region. Some were evacuated but their houses were washed away or blown away, so shelter is also an increasing need." Photo from Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 

 

"We also see some issues in terms of how we can provide assistance to children and women in terms of their protection," says Gjeff. Photo from Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 

 

"I can see vegetation flattened, even bamboo, one of the strongest plants, is bent in half," says Aaron Aspi. "But in the marketplace we passed, people were already starting to clean up." Photo from Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 


"Nothing really prepared us for this catastrophe," says Aaron Aspi. "All of our preparations were just overpowered by the force of Typhoon Haiyan." Photo from Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 

 

The full scale of the disaster caused by Typhoon Haiyan is only now becoming apparent. Photo from Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 

 

World Vision staff reached hard-hit Tacloban, Philippines, on Nov. 10. 

 

 

 

Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 

 

 

 

 

Loads of trees have been decapitated. When you look at the mountains, they look bare and stripped of all vegetation," says Aaron Aspi. Photo from Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 

 

 

"We are really racing against time to establish a safe travel route to reach those who are in the most need," says Aaron Aspi. Photo from Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 

 

World Vision staff reached hard-hit Tacloban, Philippines, on Nov. 10. 

 

Roads, bridges, and other transportation routes were destroyed by Typhoon Haiyan, hindering aid to remote areas. Tacloban, Philippines, Nov. 10. 

 

 

 

 © 2013World Vision